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How to choose the best sports HDTV for you By DMO Affiliate Are you all about watching sports games on the biggest and best TV possible? If so, check out the top features to look for in an HDTV from fellow sports enthusiast and tech journalist, Anthony Carboni, before the next game! ...Read More »
Reconnecting with Lost Video by Relinking By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Final Cut Pro X manages all of your media files by grouping them in various Events that you create. This makes it more difficult, but not impossible, for media files to go missing. Events can be moved, deleted or renamed, and Apple recommends that you do these operations from within Final Cut Pro itself so that FCPX can always properly keep track of the media files. But there will be times when you move, delete, or rename files directly in the Finder, and that could prevent FCPX from properly referencing the media files. ...Read More »
Pesky Updates Ate the Video of My Homework By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Apple recently updated Final Cut Pro to version 10.0.3, adding a boatload of welcome new features and fixes, and just as with the previous updates, also introducing a number of problems for people after updating to the latest version of FCPX. There are a few things you can do to prepare for an update to help minimize problems and disruptions to your workflow, and a few things you can do after an update to help recover. This tutorial will outline some steps you can take to a more successful update. ...Read More »
Under New Management By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia In legacy versions of Final Cut Pro you had to set scratch disks to manage where your video data and cache files would be stored. And you were limited to twelve drives at any one time. Final Cut Pro X makes it easier to specify where your video and project files are stored, automatically saving your Events and Projects in the Movies folder by default. But have no fear, your Events and Projects can be stored on any drive connected to your Mac, and you can easily move existing Events and Projects between drives when needed to keep your stories organized. ...Read More »
Intangible Tangibility By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia In the digital age of filmmaking we no longer rely on the tangibility of film to preserve our work during editing and post-production, but on the collected virtual sequences of binary ones and zeroes stored magnetically or optically on various flavors of digital media. The new digital workflow brings about its own issues of storage, maintenance, and long term reliability which makes it all the more essential to protect your story's data files. ...Read More »
Final Cut Pro X Favorite Things By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Final Cut Pro X introduced a lot of new tools, features and interface elements that take some getting used to, because they don't necessarily work the way they did in legacy FCP. So how do you go about preserving those selections of desirable clip segments you've spent valuable time marking for editing, in a persistent manner? In this tutorial, we'll show you that marking clips as Favorites, may become one of your favorite things. ...Read More »
Choosing Boris Continuum Complete for a New System By Jeremiah Hall I switched from Final Cut Pro to Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 last summer, and three projects later, I'm still happy. But when I wrote my original article, there was one thing I never considered - losing my existing plug-ins I used in FCP. Every editor has plug-ins, some we use daily, others we only need to pull out once in a great while. After Effects and Premiere come with some pretty useful ones, but once in a while I need something a little more specialized. ...Read More »
My Favorite Things By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia In the legacy versions of Final Cut Pro you marked a portion of a clip that you wanted to use by setting in and out points. One cool thing about in and out points is that they are persistent, that is, once set in a clip they remain set until you explicitly removed them. This made it very easy to edit multiple clips into the Timeline with just the scenes you wanted. ...Read More »
Accessing Camera Archive Data for Other Programs By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia A Camera Archive is a complete back up of the contents of a videotape (for tape-based cameras), or a memory card or hard drive (for file-based cameras). Normally the video in a camera archive is only accessible from within Final Cut Pro, but what if you need to use some of the archived video in another editing program? You could import the needed video into Final Cut Pro and then export it from a project, but that is quite a bit of work. With a bit of care video from a camera archive can be made available to be imported directly into other software, and this tutorial will show you how. ...Read More »
Creating a Camera Archive By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Creating a camera archive creates a backup that frees your camera or capture media for reuse, preserves and protects your media for future use (this should also be enhanced with more traditional backup options like Mac OS X's Time Machine), and finally the camera archive feature helps preserve the date structure used by your camera to make it easier to store and access your video files. A camera archive can be easily mounted (in some cases automatically) and the video imported at any time. ...Read More »
Importing from iPhoto or Aperture By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia If you are an avid user of iPhoto or Aperture, Apple's consumer and professional photo management tools you probably have shoeboxes worth of photos, all carefully organized, cropped, color adjusted, keyword tagged, and now just crying to be seen. Somewhere. Anywhere? ...Read More »
Importing from iMovie By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia It's possible you may have dabbled with video editing in iMovie, that it was your first introduction into video editing. If so, then you can easily bring those iMovie gems to a whole new luster by importing the events and projects you created in iMovie directly into Final Cut Pro. Once there, you can take advantage of all the high-end new features that iMovie could only aspire to have. There are two ways to import iMovie assets into Final Cut Pro, either import just the iMovie Events, or import the iMovie projects. This tutorial explains how to do both. ...Read More »
Importing video from an iSight or Facetime camera By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Just as the options for what you want to import have increased, so have the steps for import decreased, as FCP now takes over many of the tasks previously required of you. Simply make selections on what you want to import, and how you want to import it, and Final Cut Pro goes to work in the background to organize, transcode and optimize footage, freeing you up to get started on the most important task of all - viewing and editing the story you want to tell. ...Read More »
Minimizing Wind Noise By Ben Longden Nothing annoys me more on a location shoot than wind noise. In fact I've had more than an earful of it, and decided to do something serious about it. The occasion was on location at a major horse stud, filming a tutorial for my client, a major veterinarian firm in northern Victoria. ...Read More »
How To Create Your Own Film Script By DMO Affiliate This instructional video is a helpful time-saver that will enable you to get good at screenwriting. Watch our tutorial on How Create Your Own Film Script from one of Videojug's professional experts. ...Read More »
Using the Vegas Pro color scopes By Gary Rebholz Vegas Pro software features four sophisticated video scopes that you can use to analyze your video and gain insight into color correction filtering that you might need to do in order to achieve the best results possible. In this article, I'll talk about each of the four scopes and give you some examples of how they work and how you might use them to improve the look of your videos. ...Read More »
Displaying Closed Captions in Windows Media Player By Gary Rebholz With the improvements that we made to the closed captioning workflow in Vegas Pro 10 software, you can now create and export closed caption files for use with the videos you encode to WMV format whether for inclusion on a disc or for streaming over the web. That part's easy and we explain the exact techniques for doing so in our extensive training video that you'll find on the Seminar Series training package for Vegas Pro 10 software. In this article, I'll talk about how you can make those WMV closed captions viewable in the Windows Media Player. ...Read More »
Working with your HDSLR footage in Vegas Pro 10 By Gary Rebholz For the most part, you use the exact same techniques to work with files from your HDSLR as you do any other footage that you add to your Vegas Pro timeline. There are no specific "HDSLR-only" editing techniques that you need to learn, so if you already edit other types of footage with Vegas Pro software, use the same techniques for your HDSLR footage. ...Read More »
Understanding Video Compositing By Gary Rebholz One set of compositing controls remain largely unexplored and underutilized by perhaps most Vegas Pro editors. The composite mode options give you a wide range of control over the look of your project, but many people don't understand how they work. So in this article, we'll take a look at some examples that will help you understand how composite modes work and how you can use them to enhance your projects. ...Read More »
10 Audio Editing Tips To Help You Work Faster In Sound Forge Pro By Gary Rebholz Ten audio editing techniques that will not only help speed up your editing sessions, but also help you get more out of the application and accomplish more with it. Although I focus on Sound Forge Pro in this article, most of these techniques also work in Sound Forge Audio Studio 10, so you can take advantage of them regardless of the version you use. ...Read More »
Sharp develops an LCD with 16x the resolution of HDTV By DMO Affiliate It's the world's highest resolution LCD screen, and it could be in Japanese homes in 2020. The 85-inch screen, developed by Sharp, is for Super Hi-Vision, a next-generation broadcasting technology that packs 16 times the resolution of today's high-definit ...Read More »
Mac Panasonic MOD Video Converter Enables You To Edit Panasonic SDR Series To IMovie Or FCP Doremisoft Panasonic MOD Camcorder Video Converter for Mac users to convert or edit Panasonic SDR MOD video in Mac program like iMovie, FCE, FCP, etc. ...Read More »
Mac Canon MOD Converter Makes You Import or Edit Canon FS Series to iMovie Best Canon MOD Converter for Mac allows you to convert Canon FS camcorder MOD video to iMovie, FCE or FCP supporting video formats. ...Read More »
Video-Based Review of GridIron Flow 2.0 Essentials By Pedro Ruiz Think of Flow 2.0 essentials as a visual Dropbox for media assets, with versioning and time tracking. Let's take a look at a project I have setup. ...Read More »
How to import flip ultra/mino hd/slidehd MP4 to Adobe Premiere Pro/Elements? By WIKI Adobe Premiere is an incredible consumer editing software that brings numerous amazing features to its fans. There are multiple versions, like Adobe Premiere Pro CS 4, Adobe Premiere Pro CS3, Adobe Premiere Elements 6.0, etc. But just like some other software, it also has some format limitations. When people try to import Flip video to Adobe Premiere for editing, they will feel frustrated because Premiere cannot read Flip video directly. ...Read More »
Five Media Composer tricks you can't live without By Kevin McAuliffe I've been an editor for a long time, and Media Composer has been one of my tools right from the start, and over the years, I've come across some good tricks to help enhance my workflow. Some might be obvious once you see them, but others can be a little bit more "hidden". Here are five of my top five "tricks" for Media Composer. ...Read More »
Media Composer 5 Feature Showcase By Kevin McAuliffe We AVid users have had a BIG problem, and that was working with footage that was not OMF or (now) MXF. Any footage that wasn't captured via the digitize tool needed to be imported and converted to either OMF or MXF, and in many cases, the process was excruciatingly long if files weren't rendered with the Avid Codec. Thankfully, with Media Composer 5, that is no longer the case. ...Read More »
Media Composer 5 Feature Showcase Part 2 By Kevin McAuliffe With Media Composer version 5, Avid is moving in not only a forward direction, but in a bit of a sideways direction as well. Premiere Pro CS5 and Final Cut Pro are drag-and-drop editing applications. This means that you can not only drag clips from the preview window and drop it into your timeline, but you now have an extensive amount of flexibility when dragging clips around in your timeline as well. ...Read More »
Converting Flip Video To Other Video Formats By WIKI Flip video converter is seen as the best way to convert flip video files. All Flip family support: Flip Mino, Flip Ultra, Flip MinoHD, Flip UltraHD, and new Flip SlideHD. Transfer and convert Flip video with Flip video converter! ...Read More »
Neo 3D Tutorial -- Muxing 2D CineForm clips for 3D By David Newman Cineform CTO and co-founder David Newman demonstrates a brief tutorial for those getting started with 3D. This explains how to take separate Left and Right eye CineForm AVI or MOVs and multiplex them into a single CineForm 3D clip. ...Read More »
Final Cut Pro 7 Essential Training: Creating a freeze frame and still image By Abba Shapiro In this clip, host Abba Shapiro looks at how to create a freeze frame and a still image in Final Cut Pro. He iterates that you can park the playhead to any part of the video and grab a still image. He shows how to grab the freeze frame using the Modify>Make Freeze frame drop down command. He then shows how to create a still image and how to choose the file format that Final Cut enables you to save to. ...Read More »
Final Cut Pro 7 Essential Training: Subclips into markers By Abba Shapiro In this clip, host Abba Shapiro discusses how to use subclipping using markers. He shows how to turn markers into subclips based upon the original markers in the movie. ...Read More »
Final Cut Pro 7 Essential Training: Variable Speed By Abba Shapiro In this clip, host Abba Shapiro shows how to use Final Cut Pro's variable speed control, showcasing how to change the speed of a clip over time. He detqails this with a clip, applying a qucik burst of speed, and then slowing down the clip again over time. ...Read More »
Final Cut Pro 7 Essential Training: Rippling Delete By Abba Shapiro In this clip, host Abba Shapiro discusses ripple delete to have the markers move. He shows how to turn the ripple delete off and on, so you can have your markers move and not move, depending if the feature is turned on. ...Read More »
Slip Trim to Fit Music in Vegas Pro By Jeffrey P. Fisher One advantage to being a Sony Vegas Pro user is how efficient the software makes you. By learning a few keyboard shortcuts, you can finish your projects faster. ...Read More »
Final Cut Pro 7 Essential Training: Changing clip speed By Abba Shapiro Changing the speed of a clip is something that you will do frequently as an editor. In this clip, host Abba Shapiro discusses several ways to achieve this in Final Cut Pro. ...Read More »
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